Monday, August 31, 2015

Hood River Harvest Express



It’s harvest time in Oregon’s Hood River Valley and you don‘t want to be late for the Mt Hood Railroad Harvest Express. The train rolls in to the Hood River city depot at 10am sharp each Friday and Saturday to take on passengers for a unique 22-mile-long ride.

According to Ron Kaufman, the Hood River Railroad’s General Manager, the ride gives a glimpse into Hood River history and dates back more than a century. “The rail service is how people got to this town back in 1906 and we’ve been in continual operation ever since. We haul freight year round and we take passenger excursions, too. It’s a blast to feel the jostle of the rail cars as you travel a line that’s pretty much the way it was back then.”

Local resident Roman Fey is the Mt Hood Railroad conductor and says that passengers love to step aboard and touch the past. “There’s something really old fashioned about this that folks can’t find anywhere else. So, I feel pretty lucky to do this and it’s great to do it in my hometown.”

The train rolls out and immediately offers spectacular views to the river and valley that you cannot see from the paved highway. There’s also bonus to the pace of the ride. “It’s a bit slower and that takes folks back to kind of a bygone era when life wasn’t quite so fast. I tell folks to just look out the window and enjoy the scenery and unique views,” said Kaufman.

Soon the views include scores of family-owned farms and orchard, where fruit trees are heavy with fall bounty. Kiyokawa Family Orchards near Parkdale entices shoppers with many apple varieties grown on their fertile land. Popular apples like Gala and Fuji are available alongside lesser-known varieties like Ginger Gold.

Randy Kiyokawa said they offer more than 80 varieties, including the dinner-plate-sized giants called “Hanner’s Jumbo,” a variety that can weigh up to 4 pounds. He also held up a stunner of an apple with an incredible surprise called “Mountain Rose.” With a quick flick of his pocket knife blade, Randy showed off the gorgeous inside of an apple that looked more like a crimson red watermelon.

Be sure to check out the many U-Pick rows of fruit trees, too. More than three acres of apples and pears are grown adjacent to the family store, and Randy said picking the fruit is easy enough for anyone to try. “The fruit is within easy reach, and no ladders are required. It’s really a lot of fun whether you’re a youngster or an oldster; there will be an apple there for you to pick.”

Ingi Song brought his family to the valley from Beaverton, and they were having a blast loading up boxes of beautiful apples. The activity was a perfect getaway for his family. “It’s away from the city and gets us out to do something different together. The scenery is gorgeous up here in the Hood River Valley too,” he said.

You’ll love hearing the Mt Hood Railroad call you back to ramble along the Hood River Valley. It’s a chance to leave the driving to someone else on a scenic ride that’ll leave you wide-eyed and slack-jawed for Oregon’s abundant beauty.

INFORMATION COURTESY OF
Grant's Getaways Travel Oregon
http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/hood-river-harvest-express/


Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!
           
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity


Wednesday, August 26, 2015

The 2015 Annual Dahlia Festival

 
 
 
The 2015 Annual Dahlia Festival
 

About The Festival

Floral arranging demonstrations and talk on dahlia culture take place daily during the festival at 1pm. Live dahlia tuber dividing demonstration 12noon to 5pm each day during the festival.
You can also take a stroll through and view over 40 acres of dahlias in full bloom during the show. Be sure to take some cut flowers home with you to extend your visit and remember the beauty. Dogs are allowed on the premises on a leash, however they are not allowed in the indoor display rooms.

Food booths & refreshments will be located at the farm during this event:

St. Joseph's Winery - Wine tasting
G4 - Kettle Corn & Smoothies
Ebner's Custom Meats - Yummy BBQ
Sweet Thangs' - Coffee & Sweets
Seven Brides Brewing - Craft beer
Dano's Dogs - Fabulous franks (Zenner's sausages & hot dogs) - Sept 5, 6, & 7 only.
The Pizza Cart - Delicious pizza! - Aug 29, 30, 31 only.

Live Music from 12:00noon - 4:00pm daily during the festival!

We have our amazing musicians lined up for the festival! We hope you can join us!
This years line up:
Sat Aug 29th - Steve Hale http://stevehale.com/
Sun Aug 30th - Rae Gordon http://www.raegordon.com/
Mon Aug 31st - Joni Harms http://joniharms.com/
Sat Sept 5th - Steve Hale
Sun Sept 6th - Rae Gordon
Mon Sept 7th - Rae Gordon

Family Fun During the event

Joy Entertainers - Balloon Artist & Face Painting
To view this event please click on this link - Dahlia Festival Video
Can’t make it to the festival? Then just come visit the gorgeous fields that are also open AUGUST 1ST through SEPTEMBER, 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 8 am to 6 pm. Lots of free parking and picnic tables for those who wish to enjoy a lunch among the blooms.
We cordially invite the public to come and enjoy the view!! See you soon!!
Fresh cut dahlias are available daily at our farm, July through frost.
Special orders are available upon pre-order request. To order cut flowers please call (503) 266-7711.
Our festival is held at our farm in Canby - 995 NW 22nd Ave, Canby, OR 97013
 
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!
http://www.teampendley.com/
                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity


Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Oregon Soldiers training at DPSST in Salem today, to protect Oregonians...

Oregon Soldiers training at DPSST in Salem today, to protect Oregonians...
 Thank you for your selfless service and sacrifice!
 
 



Late last week, Oregon Governor Kate Brown authorized the activation of an additional 250 Oregon National Guard members to assist with ongoing firefighting efforts throughout the state.
The additional personnel are scheduled to report to the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon to undergo firefighting training starting Wednesday, Aug. 26. DPSST officials say the additional group should complete their training by Aug. 30.
The additional ...250 volunteers are comprised of Oregon Guard units from around the state. Half of the additional Guard members are Citizen-Airmen from the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, Oregon, and the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The other half of the additional Guard members are from the Oregon Army National Guard's 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team.
The first group of Oregon Soldiers activated are currently undergoing training at DPSST, and are scheduled to complete their training by Aug. 25. As of Monday, Aug. 24, this first group is scheduled to head to the Canyon Creek Complex Firebase where they will assist first responders, initial attack contract crews and fire managers.
The Soldiers in the first group come from units across the state, including; 224 Engineering Company, 1-186 Infantry Battalion, 1-82 Cavalry, 141 Brigade Support Battalion and 1249 Engineer Company. They join Soldiers from Charlie 7-158 Aviation, and Army and Air National Guard Joint Staff who have been participating in the effort since Aug. 3.



Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!

                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

 

Monday, August 24, 2015

Loon Lake

 

 

 



About Loon Lake and its History

About 1,400 years ago a major landslide in the coast range of western Oregon sent a mountainside of debris and house-size boulders down into and across a deep and narrow river canyon. The resulting dam combined with the annual rainfall formed Loon Lake. At its outlet, Mill Creek drops over 120 feet in less than 1/4 mile of spectacular waterfalls and pools.
Several hundred years ago, the first inhabitants were Indians who traveled on foot from the coast and from inland valleys. They came mostly to Ash Valley to camp, gather huckleberries and hunt elk. In the year 1850, when Scottsburg was becoming an important commercial trade center, two men were following Indian trails when they discovered the lake and named it after the common Loon duck which they had seen nesting. Early settlers lived in Ash Valley where they farmed, trapped, hunted and traded for a living. Not until the 1930's did Loon Lake receive significant attention when it was used for storing logs for transporting them by truck to the mill in Gardiner on the coast of Oregon. The logging road into the north end of the lake provided the first access by automobile. By the early 1960's the site where logs had been loaded onto trucks became a popular recreation area for the whole family
 

Recreational Opportunities

Protected from coastal winds, fog and milder temperatures than the coast and inland areas, Loon Lake is ideal for camping, picnicking, hunting, fishing, water-skiing, sunbathing, swimming and hiking. The natural setting among the large Douglas-Fir, Western Hemlock and Red Cedar trees, along with a sand beach, boating access and developed recreational facilities have made Loon Lake Lodge a popular scenic recreation area during the spring, summer and fall months. The fishing is the best in the coastal parts of Oregon with Largemouth Bass, Trout and many other varieties.
 

Services

Services including lodging, camping, deli, store, gas, boat launch and rental, ice, firewood is available at Loon Lake Lodge. The lodge and its facilities are open for the whole family. Spend your vacation, weekend or enjoy a one-day visit to the lodge. The drive and areas around the lake are very beautiful, offering opportunities to see wildlife, nature and a hidden valley that looks a little bit like Switzerland or Austria. The lake setting at the lodge is breathtaking, summer, fall, winter and spring.

FOR MORE INFORAMTION VISIT
http://loonlakerv.com/index.php


Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!

                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Monday, August 10, 2015

Newberry National Volcanic Monument



Newberry National Volcanic Monument is also a recreational playground for thousands of visitors each year. Newberry Crater holds two alpine lakes, East and Paulina, which are home to trophy-size brown and rainbow trout, as well as kokanee and Atlantic salmon.    Seven campgrounds in the Crater, offer shoreline camping, boat ramps, sanitary facilities, group camping, and a horse camp with equestrian trails. In the winter, the Crater is a popular destination for both snowmobilers and cross-country skiers. Miles of trails run through the Monument, offering visitors year round opportunities for hiking and exploring. Hiking trails, include the popular Peter Skene Ogden National Recreation Trail and other trails lead to major lava flows and around portions of the crater rim. The northwest border of the Monument is the Wild and Scenic Deschutes River, where river rafters and kayakers bounce through whitewater rapids formed by narrow channels carved through the lava.    A wildlife refuge already exists within the caldera rim, and it will continue to be managed by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The remainder of the monument is managed for hunting under state laws.     The Big Obsidian Flow, created 1,300 years ago, covers 700 acres. The black, shiny obsidian field is easily accessible from good roads or a new trail that traverses the flow.Throughout much of the monument, you can view major lava flows that record the geologic history of the area. One flow changed the course of the Deschutes River. Another sudden lava flow created Lava Cast Forest, where visitors can see molds of downed trees and stumps frozen in time when the lava cooled.   At least one cave, Lava River Cave, is located within the monument. Visitors can reach it easily by road and explore it using lanterns.Some of the finest fishing in Central Oregon occurs within the Newberry caldera, at Paulina and East Lakes. The 10-mile long Paulina Creek flows out of Paulina Lake. In addition, three major waterfalls, Benham, Dillon and Lava Island, occur along the Deschutes River in the northwest corner of the monument. A 30-member committee, formed in 1988 by local citizens, wrote the bill creating Newberry National Volcanic Monument. Composed of environmentalists, forest industry leaders, recreation club representatives, geothermal interests, local government, and others, the group met regularly with Forest advisors to settle proposed boundaries. Complex issues such as resolving geothermal claims already in existence and satisfying commercial timber and recreation concerns challenged the committee. The final bill, approved by Congress and signed by President Bush in November 1990, reflected the consensus reached by committee members after careful consideration of all these issues.Provisions included in the bill allow current geothermal leases to continue in designated special management and transferal areas. In many cases, surface entry is not allowed within these areas, which total 10,300 acres.

: With its huge elevation range, climate on the Deschutes changes drastically depending on elevation. The high elevations receive much more precipitation and colder temperatures. Much of the precipitation comes from October to April, mostly in the form of snow in the higher elevations. Winter temperatures can drop below zero degrees Fahrenheit. Late spring, summer and early autumn tend to bring clear, sunny days, with warm to hot temperatures at the low elevations and moderate temperatures at the higher elevations. Summer afternoon thunderstorms are not uncommon.
  
Location: The Newberry National Volcanic Monument, located about ten miles south of Bend in Central Oregon, is one of the nation's newest national monuments.
  
Contact Info: Deschutes National Forest1645 Highway 20 EastBendOR97701541-383-5300

INFORMATION COURTESY OF
Travel Oregon
http://traveloregon.com/see-do/natural-wonders/forests-parks-refuges/national-parks/newberry-national-volcanic-monument-2/


Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!
http://www.teampendley.com/

                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Oregon Willamette Valley Trails, Wineries and Covered Bridges



Across Oregon, some of my favorite places to explore are those as close as my own backyard; sometimes they hide in plain sight! So it is this week as Jeff Kastner and I wandered across Polk County and discovered terrific mountain bike trails, an enticing parkland with a covered bridge, a winery with deep Oregon roots and one of the best “smelling” places in the state.
Scenery zips past at a shattering pace when you fly across “Bonzai Downhill” at Black Rock Mountain, near Falls City in Polk County. Black Rock Mountain offers “free riding” mountain biking across 500 acres of state forest land and most riders call it “a little piece of heaven.”


The volunteer organization that makes it all work is called the Black Rock Mountain Bike Association (BRMBA). Longtime rider Rich Bontrager told me that the group is approaching 15 years old and a couple thousand members strong. He noted that it all started with a simple dream. “I think we all need to help get people off the couch and out in the forest … to see that there’s other stuff out here than the city pavement or a computer game – this place draws folks seeking something new and different and exciting.”


It all begins with designing the features that include ramps, jumps and berms that are approved by the Oregon Department of Forestry and then built by the club members. Bontrager noted that the concept of a mountain bike destination play area is a first on the Oregon State Forest. “Forest managers take a look at our proposals and make sure the ideas won’t create an environmental hazard or be too close to a watershed.”

BRMBA member Todd Glascow, a longtime rider, said that “feature” ideas are really born of the experiences that riders have as they take on trails across the United States. “Oh yes – we ride other areas, see other things and incorporate them into our own ideas and then take a spin on it. While some material is bought and some donated, a good majority of the wood that we use is fallen timber found in the forest.”

Whether catching big air or enjoying the freedom that comes from speeding down a forest trail on two wheels, the riders agree that there’s something for every level of experience at Black Rock Mountain. “You’re out here in the trees and you’re away from everything else,” noted Glascow. “You’re far away from the daily grind. You can have a stressful day or stressful week and you come out here and ride a bike – it’s all gone! It’s one of the hidden gems, off the beaten path.”
That may be true, but that’s changing fast as more visitors discover Polk County’s hidden gems are worth the time to seek out and enjoy — like Luckiamute Falls at Falls City, where the Luckiamute River cuts a bee-line through eastern flanks of the coast range and falls in a 20-foot tall, heart pounding moment.

It’s a good start for a day long adventure across a rural county that’s perfect getaway from city hub-bub and noise. In fact, some Polk County backroads don’t give you much choice except to get off the road to see the sites! So it is on State Highway 223 at Ritner Creek Covered Bridge and Park. It’s an interesting place because really – the bridge shouldn’t be here at all.

Forty years ago, the bridge was in ruins, but local school children thought the historic bridge was worth saving and a local ballot measure did just that in 1974. The rebuilt bridge is now a fine place to beat the heat before moving 30 minutes east to scenic Eola Hills Legacy Vineyard where owner Tom Huggins is living his dream. Huggins planted his first grapes in 1982, so Eola Vineyard is one of Oregon’s earliest. “Everything the Oregon wine people did revolved around making wine, selling wine, growing grapes and they all just loved what they were doing. I decided that I’m going to try and do it too,” he says of what drew him to winemaking.

Huggins grows pinot noir and other wine grape varieties across 160 acres just a handful of miles east of Rickreal. Eola’s Legacy Vineyard is a great place to relax and savor the stunning view of the wide scenic apron of the Willamette Valley.

Located off State Highway 99, just four miles south of Rickreal, be sure to explore an oasis of calm and serenity that’s been up and running family operation since 1990. Manager and co-owner Rhonda Johnson said Lavender Lake Farms helps the world smell better! “Visitors can come out and cut their own flowers when we’re in bloom and they can watch us distill the lavender into oil. We also have a gift shop and they can buy products that are made with lavender and we also have food so folks can taste lavender spices cookies and other baked goods.”

Johnson added that lavender “history” reaches back through the centuries to Roman, Greek and Egyptian cultures. It’s been used as an aromatic perfume, a cleanser, medicine and lavender is found in many delicious food recipes. Lavender is easy to grow – the plants tolerate heat and cold – doesn’t like fertilizer and is a pretty addition to any landscape. “Once you see one or two of the buds open up to a flower,” added Johnson, “that’s exactly when you want to cut it to dry it. If you wait until they open up to a flower, they won’t stay on the stem and will fall off.”
Lavender Lake Farms, like all the stops we visited in this Willamette Valley adventure, is open year-round

Author
Grant McOmie
http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/willamette-valley-trails-wineries-and-covered-bridges/


Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!

                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity