Friday, July 31, 2015

Team Pendley's w RE/MAX Integrity Get to Know Oregon Willamette Falls Locks




Willamette Falls Locks is on the west bank of the Willamette River in West Linn, Ore.

The historic Willamette Falls Locks were built in the early 1870s to move river traffic around the 40-foot horseshoe-shaped basalt ridge between Oregon City and West Linn, Ore.

The locks opened on New Year's Day 1873, and were operated by a number of owners before the Corps purchased them in 1915 from Portland Railway Light and Power Company for $375,000

Most people don't know there is more to visiting Willamette Falls than just stopping at one of the two viewpoints alongside Interstate 205 or Highway 99E. It's a natural resource with a long history that continues today along the Willamette River.

"People stop by the viewpoints and they look at the falls for 20 minutes and leave," says Sandy Carter, director of the Willamette Falls Heritage Foundation. "They miss out on all the history and information about the falls and what it has meant to Oregon City and the state."

 Carter, along with her foundation, have worked hard to not only keep a museum of the history of the falls and the locks open, but are also trying to get better signage for the viewpoints so visitors know where to look to find out more about the 42-foot-tall horseshoe-shaped basalt cascade.

The museum, located along the oldest continuously operating multi-lift lock and canal system in the United States, offers a glimpse into the history of not only the development that today surrounds the falls, but also how native Americans used the falls as fishing grounds.

"The museum is self guided and we urge people to sign in the guest book so we know how many people are visiting," Carter says as she walks up the stairs in the museum. "It has a lot of information about the how the locks were designed and the falls."

By visiting the museum, which is about a quarter-mile walk from the West Linn Police Department parking lot, you could even get the special treat of seeing boats go through the locks and watch how the locks operate. The museum is housed in the old lockmaster's office, so you have the perfect vantage point when boats come through the lock system. It's worth the wait.

Getting There: Viewpoints for the Willamette Falls are located along Highway 99E just south of downtown Oregon City and Interstate 205 (milepost 7.5), again south of the city. The 99E viewpoint offers closer looks at the falls, but the 205 viewpoint is higher up, so you can see more of the surrounding bluffs and scenery.

To board the Belle of the Falls: Take Interstate 205 to the McLoughlin Boulevard/Oregon City exit then travel north on McLoughlin Boulevard to Clackamette Drive. Turn left on Clackamette Drive to the transit dock

Getting to the locks: Take Interstate 205, exit at West Linn (exit 8), turn south onto Highway 43, and south again onto Mill Street on the west side of the Oregon City Bridge. Parking is available in the parking lot by City Hall off of Mill Street.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
http://www.oregon.com/attractions/willamette-falls


Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!

                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Team Pendley's w RE/MAX Integrity Get to Know Oregon Clackamas River Trail



Clackamas River Trail
 
Clackamas River Trail, a low elevation trail, travels along the Clackamas River. One of the scenic attractions is the 100 foot high Pup Creek Falls. There are many falls and cascades along the trail. The trail traverses over rocky outcroppings, along the river bank, through clearings and old growth trees. Since this trail had major reconstruction in spring 1999, it is in excellent shape, but is no longer open to mountain bike use.
Directions: From Estacada: Travel south on Hwy. 224 for 16 miles to Rd. 54. Turn right onto Rd. 54, Fish Creek Trailhead parking is on your right across the bridge. The trail is located at the far end of the parking lot, across Rd. 54.
Seasonal Access: Normally Accessible: April-November
Facility Type: Trail

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
http://wyeastblog.org/2011/06/12/clackamas-river-trail/


Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!

                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Monday, July 20, 2015

Team Pendley w/RE/MAX Integrity Get To Know Oregon White River Falls



White River Falls
   Wasco County, Oregon

White River Falls is the first step of the major falls of the White River, and was formerly considered to be a two-tiered fall. The falls drop 75 feet over a broad horseshoe-shaped ledge cut in the basalt bedrock, splitting into anywhere from three to six distinct segments during much of the year, but during the peak of spring runoff the entire ledge can be submerged, creating a thundering wall of water that can stretch to as much as 250 feet in width.

The falls feel oddly out of place in the gently undulating foothills on the east side of the Cascades near the town of Maupin. The White River originates on Mount Hood some 40 miles upstream, gathering lots of smaller tributaries as it rolls downhill towards its confluence with the Deschutes River. By the time it reaches the Tygh Valley its a fairly substantial river. Tygh Valley happens to be where the river intersects the plateau-like flood basalts that layer practically all of eastern Oregon and the resulting two-stepped waterfall serves as a harsh transition from peaceful farmlands on one side to a twisting, geologically storied canyon on the other.

The falls being situated in an agricultural area resulted in it being harnessed for both hydroelectric production and irrigation use in the past. Upstream from White River Falls is the remnants of the diversion structures, which continue to redirect the majority of the river toward the old intake system for the now defunct hydroelectric plant located near the base of the falls. This causes much of the river to spill over a portion of White River Falls in a way which it would not naturally, ensuring that more of the most visible part of the falls dries out during the summer.
HISTORY AND NAMING INFORMATION
  • White River Falls is the Official name of this waterfall.
  • Known Alternate Names: Tygh Valley Falls
Until 2014, this waterfall had not been distinctly or officially recognized as separate from Celestial Falls found just 180 feet downstream. The two falls are easily viewable from the same locations throughout the canyon and are geologically and visually not distinct enough, in our opinion, to be considered separate waterfalls. However Celestial Falls, having long been a popular location for whitewater kayakers, has been colloquially referred to as such for several decades now, and in 2014 the Oregon Board of Geographic Names chose to officially adopt this name for the lower step of what was formerly considered part of White River Falls.
LOCATION AND DIRECTIONS
White River Falls are accessed within White River Falls State Park, located east of Tygh Valley between Maupin and The Dalles. Take Highway 197 south from The Dalles then turn east on Highway 216 (signed for White River Falls and Sherars Bridge). The park is found 4 miles from Highway 197. The trail leads downstream from the parking area to the bottom of the falls.

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!
                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State
of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Team Pendley w RE/MAX Integrity Get to Know Oregon Silver Creek Falls




Silver Falls State Park
By William Sullivan
 
A spectacular canyon with 10 waterfalls
About the Hike: The popular trail through Silver Falls State Park's forested canyons visits 10 spectacular waterfalls, five more than 100 feet high. The path even leads through mossy caverns behind the falls' shimmering silver curtains.This loop is suitable for families with beginning hikers because side trails provide shortcuts back to the car. Dogs are not allowed on the trail.

Difficulty: The full loop to see all 10 waterfalls (from South Falls to North Falls) is a moderate hike of 6.9 miles, gaining 700 feet of elevation, but the recommended shortcut (omitting Twin and North Falls) trims the loop to 5.1 miles.
For a shorter, 2.8-mile loop, turn back after Lower South Falls. For an even shorter 0.7-mile tour, simply loop to the bridge at the base of South Falls.
Season: Open all year. The park is usually snow-free even in mid-winter, but the falls are still quite full and the wildflowers are at their best from late March to May.

Getting There: From Interstate 5 exit 253 in Salem, drive 10 miles east on North Santiam Highway 22, turn left at a sign for Silver Falls Park, and follow Highway 214 for 16 miles to the park entrance sign at South Falls.
Coming from the north, exit Interstate 5 at Woodburn and follow Highway 214 southeast through Silverton 30 miles.
In the South Falls parking complex, follow signs to Picnic Area C, and park at the far end of the lot.

Fees: A special $3-per-car fee is charged to park anywhere in the state park.


Hiking Tips: From the South Falls Picnic Area C parking lot, follow a broad path downstream a few hundred yards to historic Silver Falls Lodge, built by Civilian Conservation Corps crews in 1940. After inspecting this rustic stone-and-log building, continue a few hundred yards to an overlook of 177-foot South Falls. From here take a paved trail to the right. Then switchback down into the canyon and behind South Falls.
A few hundred yards beyond South Falls is a junction at a scenic footbridge. Don't cross the bridge unless you're truly tired, because that route merely returns to the car. Instead take the unpaved path along the creek. This path eventually switchbacks down and behind Lower South Falls' broad, 93-foot cascade.
Beyond Lower South Falls the trail forks again. If you're wearing down, you can turn right and climb the steepish ridge trail to the canyon rim and parking lot, for a total trip length of 2.8 miles.
If you're ready for a longer hike continue straight, heading up the north fork of Silver Creek to 30-foot Lower North Falls. At a footbridge just above the falls, take a 250-yard side trail to admire tall, thin Double Falls. Then continue on the main trail past Drake and Middle North Falls to the Winter Falls trail junction.
At this point, turn right for the recommended 5.1-mile loop. This path climbs to a parking area above Winter Falls. From there, keep right on a 1.6-mile return trail through the woods to the South Falls area, the lodge, and your car.

History: Silver Falls City, platted here in 1888, was an early center for logging and some fairly unsuccessful homestead farming. Future US President Herbert Hoover surveyed some of the land here while serving as a young engineer.

By 1900, June Drake, a Silverton photographer, began pushing for park status. His early photographs of the falls have become classics. An inspector for the National Park Service rejected the area for national park status in 1926, however, because logging had scarred the area with "thousands of stumps that from a distance look like so many dark headstones."
After that, the private owner of South Falls charged admission to let people watch as he floated derelict cars over the falls. In 1928 a paying audience watched daredevil Al Faussett canoe over 177-fout South Falls. He had to spend months afterward in a hospital, recovering from his injuries.
In 1935 President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that Silver Falls would be one of his largest Recreational Demonstration Projects. He bought private land and employed young men in the Civilian Conservation Corps to develop park facilities. Since then the forest has regrown so that most visitors do not even notice that the area was once logged.

Geology: All waterfalls in the park spill over 15-million-year-old Columbia River basalt. At that time the Columbia River flowed through this area to the sea at what is now Newport. Repeated lava flows poured down the river channel from vents in Eastern Oregon, gradually pushing the river northward. As the lava slowly cooled, it sometimes fractured to form the honeycomb of columns visible on cliff edges. Circular indentations in the ceilings of the misty caverns behind the falls are tree wells, formed when the lava flows hardened around burning trees. The churning of Silver Creek gouged the soft soil from beneath the harder lava, leaving these caverns and casts.


Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!

                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity




Friday, July 3, 2015

Team Pendley w RE/MAX Integrity Get to Know Oregon Summer Sounds Albany Oregon



Albany Parks and Recreation is proud to bring you Albany’s newest concert series Summer Sounds. Food will be available for purchase
 Lay down your blanket, bring your lawn chair, and enjoy a relaxing summer music series featuring regional entertainment from across the Pacific Northwest.
The concerts are free of charge but donations are greatly appreciated
 
 
This year's lineup includes:
 
July 6
The Coats
 
 
July 13
Halie Loren
 
 
 July 20
High Street Band
 
 
July 27
Soul City
 
 
Concerts are every Monday night in July
Concerts start at 7pm
Food Vendors open at 5:30pm
Monteith Riverpark, 489 Water Ave
Concerts are free, donations are appreciated
 
 
FOR MORE INFORAMTION VISIT
 
Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!
http://www.teampendley.com/
                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity
 


Team Pendley w/ RE/MAX Integrity Get To Know Oregon RIVER RHYTHMS 2015 Albany Oregon




Summer concerts in Albany, Oregon since 1984
Concerts start at 7 p.m. unless otherwise noted
Smoking is in designated area only behind the Albany Senior Center
Pets are not allowed in the park on concert days
Alcohol is not permitted before 5:30 p.m. on concert days
 The beer garden opens at 5:30pm
 
 
'
July 2nd Jelly Bread
 
 
July 9th Andy Grammer
 
 
July 23rd, King Sunny Ade & His African Beats
 
July 30th Frankie Ballard
 
August 6th Three Dog Night
 
For more information visit
 
 
Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!
                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the
 State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity