Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Get to Know Oregon Winter Crabing




When you’re lucky enough to go fishing with a good friend who knows the water well, you’re sure to learn something new. That’s especially true when the Columbia River is under your keel to carry you toward new adventure.
Steve Fick first explored the Columbia River estuary as a kid, so he knows his way around the vast waterway where the river meets the sea. We left the snug harbor of Hammond, near Astoria, and slowly motored the short distance downriver to an area just off Clatsop Beach.
Fick had prepared five large crab pots or traps with varied baits – a strategy he often uses so to “see what the crabs prefer.” Sometimes he’ll use turkey legs, chicken wings, shad or salmon carcasses – even a can of tuna for crab bait.

“Oh yes, a can of tuna fish is perfect bait,” exclaimed Fick. “All you do is perforate the can so that the scent comes out – you can also buy canned sardines or mackerel too – both work well. As long as they have a high oil content, it seems to fish well – the scent is what draws the crab into the pot.”
Each Oregon crabber must carry an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Shellfish License. Each crabber is allowed to use up to three crab pots. We timed our trip to fish our traps during the last hour of the incoming tide and then through the high slack tide period (that’s often the best crabbing time).
Steve said it’s the safest time to crab in the estuary: “There is no reason to be out here on the ebb tide – that’s the outgoing tide and things can go from bad to worse in a heartbeat. It can be the most dangerous part of the tide cycle and this river can change so fast. You just don’t take chances out here.”

Fick said that each trap should “soak” for 15-20 minutes – that allows enough time for the crabs to locate the bait and enter the pot. Each crabber is allowed a dozen male crabs apiece and in Oregon they must be five and three-quarters (5¾) inches across the back. Females are protected to preserve the breeding population of crabs. A crab gauge or other measuring device is essential gear since some crabs miss the mark by only a fraction of an inch.
Steve and I soon had our hands full of fresh crabs, but truth was that the trap made the catching easy – and it turns out, the crab pot is 100% Oregon.

At the Airport Crab Company in Warrenton, they have rolled the steel into rings, welded the weights in place, wrapped the rings in rubber and woven the steel mesh into crab pots since 1948. “Building a crab pot – one that will fish well – is a science,” said company owner Verne Lamping.
His wife, Lisa Lamping, added, “”They really got it right way back then – there are little things you can do but for the most part there isn’t a better way to catch crab.”

Lisa is right. Dungeness crabbing dates to the earliest days of commercial fishing in Oregon’s off shore waters. It was a profitable way to make a living for many commercial fishermen during the slack times between salmon runs. Inside Oregon’s only sport and commercial crab pot manufacturing company, you soon see that the heritage of the business is alive and well.

Gene Elliott, Paul Shaw and Mike Gill collectively own more than a century of experience building pots the old fashioned way – with their hands! They “hand knit” each pot using stainless steel wire to make each pot’s top, bottom and sides. The 18-guage stainless steel wire requires tough, quick hands and a sharp eye to knit the mesh just right. “You have to hold the meshes at exactly the same size,” said Shaw. “So, you really must stay focused on the work all of the time.”

Gene Elliot’s hands worked at a blurry pace – swiftly wrapping the mesh weave, seamless and smooth. “I’ve been at this for more than 37 years – just like these fellas, but I was also a fisherman so I made and repaired my own gill nets. I was already familiar with the knitting techniques before I started working on crab pots.”

Lisa Lamping has long admired the weavers’ efforts – she explained that it’s all “piece work” so each weaver must be accurate and speedy if they wish to make money. “Each of these men is able to consistently weave the mesh accurately; the meshes must be about two inches wide. It’s very ‘old school’ and it hasn’t changed much in a hundred years.”

Down at the dock is where the work pays off. Oregon’s Dungeness crab harvest is the state’s most valuable seafood; last year, the coast-wide catch was worth nearly 50-million dollars.
“It’s an economic component that fills a big void from December to March for many fishermen,” said Fick, who owns Fishhawk Fisheries in Astoria. “Families live here and the infrastructure of support – like the crab pot businesses or the marine supply stores – all of that business stays in our community and it is key to the viability of rural life along the Oregon coast.”

It is also a lot of fun to catch your own crabs and then head to the kitchen where Steve shared a favorite recipe for a stuffed crab sandwich.” “You can do a lot of different things with crab meat,” said Fick. “You can make a chowder, fritters, salads – sandwiches – so many different things. You can mix it with fettuccine, other seafood, so it’s very versatile.”

Fick Crab Sandwich Recipe: Fick mixed one cup of grated swiss cheese with two cups of crab and added one teaspoon each of Worcestershire sauce and lemon pepper before he mixed in on cup of mayo and half a cup of sliced olives. The mixture was then stuffed into each half of a hollowed-out sandwich roll. Steve then spread a generous amount of grated Parmesan cheese across the top of each roll and slid the tray of sandwiches into a 375-degree oven for seven to ten minutes. It was a perfect way to round out our crabbing adventure and bring the day’s activity full circle from the estuary to the dining table.

Interestingly, Fick added that 80% of the crab is caught in the first month of the season – it’s also the time when prices for the seafood are at their lowest. Plus, even if you don’t sport fish for crab, the annual commercial crabbing season provides fresh Oregon Dungeness in your local grocery.
As we enjoyed a very filling seafood dinner, I asked Fick what he liked most about the adventure that’s just off his front door step:

“Oh, it’s simple to do and everyone can be involved in it. It’s easy to catch a dozen crabs per person with lots of action for kids. And – you never really know until you pull the pot up what you got!”
Save the date: Mark your calendar for the Newport Seafood & Wine Festival in February, Astoria Warrenton Crab Seafood & Wine Festival in April and the Charleston Seafood Festival in August.
Get started crabbing:
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Crabbing and Clamming Information
Crabbing 101

 Courtesy of
Travel Oregon
http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/winter-crab/


Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530
Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640
Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571
**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips
http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of the Springhill North Albany Car Show to benefit Linn County CASA
http://springhillnorthalbanycarshow.com

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Get to Know Oregon Eagle Convocation William Finley National Refuge




Published on Feb 14, 2014
One of the most amazing Oregon wildlife moments is found atop four story-tall cottonwood trees near Tangent where an eagle convocation draws up to 100 eagles in the Linn County tree tops each evening. You can also visit wildlife refuges and see eagles in the Willamette Valley. Molly Monroe, US Fish and Wildlife Biologist at William Finley National Refuge near Corvallis said that there are three wildlife refuges — Finley, Ankeny and Baskett Slough that are easily accessed public settings to see bald eagles and other birds, including thousands of waterfowl.

William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge

is situated along the foothills of the Coast Range at the western edge of the fertile Willamette Valley of northwestern Oregon . A second unit on the east side of the river, Snag Boat Bend, has been added to the Refuge. The Refuge encompasses a diverse assortment of habitats including riparian forest, upland forest, upland prairie, wet prairie, wetlands and farm fields. Elevations range from 185 to 414 feet msl.

As with the other refuges within the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Complex, the primary management goal of William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge is to provide high quality wintering habitat for geese, especially the dusky Canada goose, to ensure healthy, viable goose populations while minimizing goose browse damage to crops on private agricultural lands.
Western meadowlarkOther management goals are to preserve native species and enhance biodiversity. Populations of several endangered and threatened animal and plant species can be found on the refuge. A herd of Roosevelt elk can be found in the bottomland forests or farm fields on the Refuge. Wildlife/wildlands observation, photography, hiking, and environmental education and interpretation are the major public use activities allowed on the Refuge. Limited hunting and fishing opportunities are also provided.

Of special interest are several historic buildings located within the Refuge including the Fiechter House, completed in 1857 and thought to be the oldest house in Benton County.
Habitat improvement and restoration are essential for the continued survival of wildlife populations in the Willamette Valley. If you are interested in restoring your lands to native habitat, such as wetlands, prairies, grasslands or upland oak/savannas, please click on the following link ” Partnership for Fish and Wildlife ” for further information.
WILD GOOSE NATURE STORE LOCATED IN REFUGE COMPLEX HEADQUARTERS FACILITY

Visitors can now look forward to finding friendly faces and information inside the office on the weekends. The Friends of the Willamette Valley NWR Complex, a non-profit organization formed to provide support to the Refuge, opened the Wild Goose Nature Store inside the headquarters office on August 21st. The new Nature Store is open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 10am – 4pm. Items relating to the Willamette Valley Refuges, the National Wildlife Refuge System, and other conservation related themes provide the inspiration behind t-shirts, hats, books, pins, and more.
Volunteers are needed! If you are interested in talking with people from all walks of life and sharing your passion for wildlife, contact the Friends at friends.secr.melanie@gmail.com. You may also contact the Refuge Ranger at (541) 757-7236 or Katrina_Maggiulli@fws.gov.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
http://www.fws.gov/willamettevalley/finley/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530
Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640
Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571
**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips

http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/
Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA
https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Get To Know Oregon Whitewater Steelhead Fishing



Author: Grant McOmie
Oregon is blessed with abundant rivers that offer countless whitewater rapids. In fact, many of the state’s rivers provide thrilling settings for exciting outdoor adventures.
On this week’s “Grant’s Getaway,” we enjoy a whitewater rafting trip that offered a unique spin: we also went fishing for the premier Oregon game fish called Winter Steelhead.
We gathered to run the Nestucca River’s whitewater rapids with guide John Krauthoefer, (Firefighter’s Guide Service: 503-812-1414,) who casts baits for king sized steelhead from aboard his fifteen-foot inflatable raft.
The Nestucca River is a fabulous coastal stream located in southern Tillamook County and is famous for its runs of salmon and steelhead.
Krauthoefer is hooked on a new plan that’s supported by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.
In fact, Chris Knutsen, a fishery biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, took a day off work so he could join us on our adventure too.
So grab your rod and reel, don’t forget the waders as we go fishing for wild winter steelhead – not to keep – but to keep them alive for a fishery future.
Anglers are encouraged to participate in the brood stock program, but they must register at the Tillamook-based North Coast Watershed District Office.
You can also visit the Cedar Creek Hatchery to observe the brood stock steelhead and learn more about the Nestucca River program.
Visit the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife for more information on Oregon Angling Licenses and visit Travel Oregon to locate an Oregon Fishing Guide.
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/whitewater-steelhead-fishing/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!


http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530
Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640
Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571
**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips
http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Springhill North Albany Car Show To Benefit Linn County CASA
https://www.facebook.com/springhillnorthalbanycarshow

Monday, February 3, 2014

Newport Oregon Seafood & Wine Festival



Newport Oregon Seafood & Wine Festival
South Beach Marina
Newport Oregon
Friday Saturday Sunday
February 20-23 2014

The Original and Still the BestTM

2014 Newport Seafood & Wine Festival-XL “Live! Life! Large!"--

Since 1978 the Newport Seafood & Wine Festival has attracted visitors from around the world to the central Oregon coast. The 2014 festival will be packed with all of the fun, food and wine you've come to know and love at the Newport Seafood & Wine Festival!

New This Year

Saturday continues to be the most attended day at the Newport Seafood & Wine Festival. In an effort to maintain safety and accommodate large crowds, we have made some adjustments to entry procedure and crowd management.
There will be NO General Admission available on Saturday. Standby tickets MAY be available after 1pm depending on capacity. Saturday’s entrance will be sold via E-Tickets ONLY. We will have two E-Ticket entrances to aid with the flow of the line. Be advised that many of our patrons arrive during peak hours (11am-3pm).
We anticipate that the adjustments we have made will improve crowd flow, however patrons who arrive during peak hours should expect a delay in entrance. Event Staff will be readily available to provide information.

Have a question about this year's event? Visit our FAQs page .

You must be 21 years or older to attend this event and must have valid ID (no exceptions). The site is smoke free and handicapped accessible.
Parking is available at the festival site for $5.00. Free shuttle buses will run on a regular schedule from downtown Newport and major hotels. Maps are available at local businesses and at the Chamber. Cab service is available for a nominal fee or call the Chamber office for transportation options.
E-tickets will be available for purchase in December. Special group rates are available as well. Ticket prices do not include wine tasting. Food item prices range from $1 and up. Wine sampling starts at $1 and glasses of wine are available for menu price. Bottles and cases of wine are sold by wineries, too!

For more information visit
http://www.seafoodandwine.com/



Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It's Less Crowded!

                                 
Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity